Monday, June 21, 2010

Domestic Violence Ruins Another Father's Day


Domestic violence has ruined more than one father's life. In Dallas, a Chief of Police's son was killed in a shoot out and Father's Day may never be the same for him. The shootout occurred at an apartment complex. Three people died, including David O'Neal Brown Jr., the adult son of Dallas police chief, David Brown. A police officer was also among the fatalities.


It all started as Police responded to a report of a domestic disturbance on Sunday evening at the apartment complex in Lancaster, a suburb of Dallas. Gunfire broke out as police arrived. During the exchange of gun fire, David O'Neal Brown Jr., 27, the son of Dallas Police Chief David Brown, was killed. A 37 year old Lancaster police officer (a father of two) was also killed.


First Assistant Chief Charlie Cato announced the death of Brown's son. "Chief Brown is with his family this evening, and we ask that you respect his privacy at this difficult time.... As Chief Brown mourns the loss of his son, he also mourns the loss of the fallen Lancaster police officer who has served his community with honor for many years."


At this time the officer's name has not been released. Nor is it known whether Brown was involved in the shooting. The third person killed was Jeremy Jontae McMillan, age 23. David Oneal Brown Jr. was no saint. "According to The Dallas Morning News, Brown Jr. was arrested in 2003 on suspicion of selling marijuana. He plead guilty to a misdemeanor. Nevertheless, Chief Brown loved and supported his son. Brown Jr. was employed and seemed to be on the path to putting his troubles behind him. Now, there is only speculation and sorrow that remains for at least two families that have endured heartache on Father's Day.

25 comments:

Anonymous said...

Sometimes the apple does fall far from the tree!

Anonymous said...

there is more to this story than has been reported.

Anonymous said...

what was the original domestic dispute all about?

Anonymous said...

Big time shoot out like the Okay Correl but in this day and age a better way to handle the matter should have been anticipated.

Anonymous said...

i happen to know david brown jr personally and there is more to the story than what everyone is hearing. He was a good man. If lancaster police would have done thier job sun morning none of this nonsense would have happened.

Anonymous said...

David brown jr would have never hurt anybody if he was in his right mind. He was a loving father to a 5 yr old boy and a 10 yr old step son and a wonderful boyfriend. Ppl who dont know the full story shouldnt have anything to say about him or the situation. Just let him rest in peace with the other victims.

Curious woman said...

What was the disturbance about?

Why do cops go in with guns blazing?

Whatever happened to diplomacy?

Anonymous said...

Will an autopsy be performed on David to see if he was on drugs?

Anonymous said...

yes an autopsy has been performed

Anonymous said...

When will autopsy results be available?

Anonymous said...

If Brown was not under the influence, then his shooting will increase the level of suspician as to why he was shot.

Anonymous said...

What's with the domestic dispute angle?

Anonymous said...

Incredible...

Neutral Perspective said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Neutral Perspective said...

In reference to the post:

"i happen to know david brown jr personally. He was a good man."

I'm sure David Brown may very well have been a "good person" at some point- most people are not born murderers. However, the type of person one is perceived in one light of life, does not forgive or erase the unacceptable deeds he/she do in the dark.

Let's take a look at "John Wayne Gacy" for example... he was married, active in his community. He would dress as a clown and entertain at children's hospitals. He was active in Chicago's Democratic Party, and was the Precinct Captain of the Norwood Park Township Comittee... he even met First Lady, Rosalynn Carter. MANY said that he was a "Good Man". The reality was later disovered that he was a murderer.

My point being, that most of us are not born "wanting" to hurt people. But there is a line- and once we cross it, what we were yesterday no longer matters.

I think what this is REALLY about, are the friends/family that David left behind... trying their best to deal with their loss, and are particularly struggling with the circumstances under which his death occured. It is easier for loved ones to deal with his death by remembering the person he was, as opposed to facing the ugly truth of what he inevitably turned into. It is a "natural reaction" as humans, for us to become defensive/protective of the ones we hold dear- regardless of the situation. This by no means implies that we (as a society)"condone" the ill actions of our loved one... it simply means that our love for them was unconditional. It's a tough situation to be in. Sometimes the reality of a situation is too much to bear at the moment.

So, to those close to him that find themselves struggling with the truth, and having difficulty dealing with your grief- it is understood, and society (most of us, anyway) do empathize. Do what you must, to deal with your grief. Believe what you will about the circumstances, to help you get past your pain. Maybe one day you will be able to accept the truth of what he became.

Neutral Perspective said...

"If lancaster police would have done thier job sun morning none of this nonsense would have happened."

...I'm not sure that I completely agree with the above statement. Even if that statement were 100% accurate, based on the events (going back to the begining of May) leading up the shooting-spree, it would be logical to conclude that a violent act of "some kind" was inevitable- if not on that day, then perhaps a week later, or a month later, etc. It is documented in police records and police video (prior to Father's Day) that he had been recently violent, and possessed violent tendencies. His criminal records clearly indicates a past involvement with drugs. ALL of these facts give a clear indication that even "if" the police had arressted him that Father's Day morning, David would have eventually hurt someone else... the only thing this evidence shows, is that he was a ticking time bomb.

Could the police have done more? ...probably so. But to place all of the responsibility on the Lancaster Police Dept is ridiculous. "Someone" in his life that he regularly associated with had to see he needed help, or at the least, had a "feeling" that something wasn't quite right. Calling the police, although was a better move than none at all, was not exactly the best way to get him help. Infact, the only it would have most likely done, was contribute too his criminal record and give him some time in a cell, rack up some legal bills for him, and definitely contribute to his extremely vulnerable and unstable mental/emotional state.

It was no secret to many, who his father is. If the intent to help David was genuine and sincere, it would have involved conspiring with his those in his family that would have the power, money, and connections to do what ever was necessary to help him.

An individual's health, is their own responsibility- if you are sick, YOU need to take care of yourself. BUT, in cases where a person may not be of sound mind or may be under the influence of a drug addiction, it then becomes the responsibility of their immediate family to help this person. It is by no means, society's responsibility.

What I would like to know is, did his girlfriend (who lived with him and who called the police on him for his violence, a few times) take the appropriate steps to inform his family?

Neutral Perspective said...

"What was the disturbance about?"

The domestic disturbance was Sunday morning of Father's Day (some 8hrs or so before the shooting spree @ 6pm). His girlfriend, Misty, called police complaining that he was acting crazy and had locked her out of the apartment- stating that her son was in the apartment with him, and there are guns in there." When the police arrived, she repeated this information to them. They spoke with David. According to ploce records, and the dash-cam video, Misty did not mention any physical violence occuring at that time- only that he was acting crazy and talking "all religious like". Aside from David talking crazy, the police had no reason to arrest him.

"Why do cops go in with guns blazing?"

The cops responded to "a shooting in PROGRESS". When the 911 calls were placed, they were informed that one person had already been fataly shot and lay dead in his car. So naturally, when the police respond to the call- it will be with weapons drawn as a precaution. THE POLICE DID NOT FIRE THE FIRST SHOT... David did. The first shots were fired by David and into the first victim that died in his car as a result. When the police arrived on the scene, David had already taken out an AK-47 from the trunk of his black Dodge Stratuss and got into his car. When David attempted to flee, the police had already set up a blockade. David began shooting once again, and in doing so, shot Police Officer Craig Shaw in the head as he tried to run for cover behind his cop car... Officer Craig Shaw's dash-cam in his police car caught the entire thing.

"Whatever happened to diplomacy?"
It's hard to implement diplomacy when a crazed man is running around damn near naked- in only a pair of boxers- killing random people and shooting at the police.

Neutral Perspective said...

"If Brown was not under the influence, then his shooting will increase the level of suspician as to why he was shot."

...Brown was shot because he killed an inoccent man and when the police arrived, Brown killed one of them too. If toxicology reports come back indicating no foriegn substances were involved, the question should then be... why in hell did he kill a man he didn't know- whose 2month old baby and 3yr old little girl were in the back seat? That little girl not witnessed her daddy's death, but both of those kids were sprayed with his blood as Brown shot him.

There is no suspicion as to why Brown was shot.

Anonymous said...

I know hind sight is always 20/20.
But it seems clear David was crying out for help long before this shooting. His behavior was reported as becoming more eratic and potentially violent. If he had been give help then, two men may still be alive.

Neutral Perspective said...

I absolutely agree with you 110%. I feel that the people closest to him should have done a lot more to "help" him.

Anonymous said...

Hindsight is always 20/20. Who knew before?

Neutral Perspective said...

I have chosen to address your question by simply cutting-n-pasting from the statements I made in an earlier post...

"based on the events (going back to the beginning of May) leading up the shooting-spree, it would be logical to conclude that a violent act of "some kind" was inevitable"

"It is documented in police records and police video (prior to Father's Day) that he had been recently violent, and possessed violent tendencies. His criminal records clearly indicate a past involvement with drugs. ALL of these facts give a clear indication that even "if" the police had arrested him that Father's Day morning, David would have eventually hurt someone else... the only thing this evidence shows, is that he was a ticking time bomb."

"Hindsight is 20/20"?

...who DIDN'T know before???

Anonymous said...

Well, what were the reasons for not arresting him earlier?

If he was on drugs, he could have been put in detox. Than two men may still be with us.

Neutral Perspective said...

Look, it's apparent that we are going to have to agree to disagree in regards to this topic.

I see, understand, and can appreciate your point of view... you feel that if the police had arrested him that day, two men would still be with us and all of David's problems that have developed over years would have miraculously disappeared with some jail time and detox. You may be right... we'll never know for sure.

I still stand firm in the belief that there are times when a person in so deeply engrossed in a problem, that they can only benefit from longterm, private, professional help from medical professionals.I believe that calling the police on him was better than not doing anything at all... I'm just saying that it obviously wasn't enough because the police had been called on him a number of times between both May and June, yet it did not solve the problem. Further more, I still believe that even if the police had arrested him that morning of Father's Day- YES, two lives would have been spared that day... but David was a ticking time bomb. It was inevitable that he was going to have a melt down. Going to jail that morning would merely have postponed his rage temporarily.

As a mother, a sister, a friend, and a woman who has loved a man, I cannot help but feel a sense of responsibility toward those I hold near and dear to my heart.

I think many would agree with me when I say that most of us feel an obligation to protect and help our loved ones in the event they are unable to care for themselves. As a sister, brother, mother, father, friend, significant other, etc... it is OUR responsibility before it is the "city's", to pick up on ques and hints that things are not 'right' with our loved one. What I would like to know is, did any of his close friends or his girlfriend take the appropriate steps to notify his family that he was headed in a downward spiral?

Again, I'm not claiming to be right or wrong. This is simply my opinion: I am responsible for my loved one, before the police are.

Legal Pub said...

Good points Mr. Neutral.

Answers anyone?